Surviving parents, brothers and sisters

If a man dies survived by his parents, brothers and sisters, who will inherit his properties if he has not made a will?

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Surviving wife, children and parents

If a man dies survived by his wife, children or parents, who will inherit his properties if he has not made a will?

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Succession to property after death

The property of a person passes on after his death by testamentary or intestate succession.  This happens by law.

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Must I make a will?

Why must I make a will? Will it avoid disputes? Will it avoid getting court orders about my properties after me?

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Nominations

Making nominations allows easy administration of some of my assets after me.

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Lists of debts and liabilities

I must also make a list of debts and liabilities before I proceed to making a will.

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A woman’s property

If I am a woman, I must know what is my property if I want to make a will. Click here to read.

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Share in ‘HUF’ properties

Making a Will – 6 . Contd…

Can I tranfer my share in ‘HUF’ properties while I am alive, or to give it away in my will?

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Share in joint properties

Making a Will – 5 . Contd…

My property includes my share in the property or asset that I own with others. Generally, I am free to transfer my share while I am alive, or to give it away in my will. What is my share in inherited and purchased property, and in joint accounts and investments?

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Making a Will

These are a series of posts about managing properties during a lifetime, so that administration is easy later. Readers will be able to decide whether to make a will, and if so, how to make it effectively.

This discussion is very plain and simple language is for a lay-person who has to decide whether, and how, he can make a will. It covers the fundamentals of managing properties, succession and will-making. It is based on Indian law.

Click here to read the first four posts.